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Last Updated: Jul 26, 2017 URL: http://libguides.danebank.nsw.edu.au/learningplus Print Guide RSS Updates

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Great interactive learning

Scientific Research

 

Mathematics

In Maths we are still seeking to answers questions or problems, in this case we are given the information and have been taught the process and are using our mathematical, logical brain to find the answer.

 

In mathematics you are seeking an answer. You are looking for the information in the question that will help you find the solution. Mathematics questions contain information – enough information for you to be able to reach the required solution. The information could be in words, numbers, measurement, process etc. Whilst there are often different journeys to the solution, as a general clue you need to be using all the information given to you to find the answer.

 

Do not get flustered

It is very easy to become flustered on difficult math problems, especially word problmes. One reason our normal breathing quickly changes to short, agitated breaths is we start reading and re-reading the same question over again. Hope that by the fourth read we will finally get it. At this point, re-reading is clearly an example of diminishing—and frustrating—returns. What to do?…

 

Let your brain decipher the question

It often may take about 30-seconds—and a couple (and only a couple) of calm rereads of the question—to decipher a complicated math question. After all, it is complicated. Deciphering the question means understanding what the question is asking. Next, find the solution path. To do so, think—or even write down—the necessary steps to get to the solution.

A few pieces of good news: you can take longer on complicated questions. After all, there aren’t too many of them. Just make sure to solve the easy and medium questions quickly and accurately. Secondly, you can always come back to a question. Sometimes, it is easier to decode the second time around.

Read the question carefully

Sometimes a problem seems much more complicated than it actually is. The reason is we are misreading a word, or injecting or own word into the question. We spend several minutes labouring through difficult equations only to realize that none of the answer choices matches up with our answer. To avoid this make you sure you don’t rush through the question. Instead, read carefully, and know what the question is asking before attempting the question.

Know when to back off

The great thing is that you can come back to questions. Sadly, many students do not take advantage of this and are unable to pull themselves from a question once they’ve bitten their teeth into it. But knowing when to unclench that jaw is very important. If a minute has gone by and you are unable to make sense of the question, move on!

 

Return with a fresh mind

The best thing about being able to come back to questions is your brain is able to make sense of the question a lot more easily the second time around. What seemed cryptic and inscrutable now seems much clearer.

"How to Approach Complicated Math Problems - Magoosh GRE Blog."Magoosh GRE Blog. 19 Dec. 2012. Web. 30 Nov. 2015.

 

You can learn anything = Khan Academy

Watch this video and find the mistake.

 

Information models of research

http://www.21stcenturyschools.com/uploads/2/1/5/4/21542794/4360821.jpg?373

 

Goals - for the learner

21stnewlogo_2.jpg

American Library Association and the International Society of Technology in Education have built a frame work about learning.

Believes information and technology literate student will be an independent learner who reads, views, listens and collaborates for pleasure, personal growth and makes connections with oneself and the world.

Here are their keys to being a 21st Century learner.

Effective Learners

 Students efficiently gather, critically evaluate, and effectively use information.

  1. Students inquire about their learning to make connections to prior knowledge, determine relevance, and deepen understanding.
  2. Students locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media to build their understanding of new concepts.
  3. Students evaluate and select appropriate information sources or tools to best complete the task.
  4. Students process data to make informed decisions.

Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate tools and resources.

  1. Students collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  2. Students use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.
  3. Students reflect on inquiry-process to inform decisions on process and/or solution

Effective Communicators and Creators

Students use appropriate media and environments to effectively communicate ideas, knowledge, and understanding to audiences ranging from local to global.

  1. Students choose appropriate media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to influence multiple audiences.
  2. Students use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, access, and use.

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using appropriate technology.

  1. Students apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, processes or learning.
  2. Students create original works as a means of personal or group expression

Effective Collaborators

Students connect with peers and recognized experts to collaborate, develop their own understanding, contribute to the learning of others, and contribute to the global society using a variety of media.

  1. Students interact, collaborate, and publish with peers experts, or others using a variety of digital environments or media to contribute to shared learning.
  2. Students engage with learners of other cultures, both face to face and online, to develop cultural understanding and global awareness.
  3. Students contribute to project teams to make decisions, produce original works, and/or solve problems.

Students practice legal and ethical behavior with an understanding of cultural and societal issues related to technology and information.
Performance Indicators:

  1. Students model personal responsibility and respect for others to demonstrate personal growth.
  2. Students advocate and practice safe and responsible use of information and technology to become ethical global citizens.
  3. Students use technological tools and information for the betterment of others.

 https://isb21.wikispaces.com/TAIL+Standards

 

Subject Guide

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Jan Stoddart
 

Types of questions

In Maths we are still seeking to answers questions or problems, in this case we are given the information and have been taught the process and are using our mathematical, logical brain to find the answer.

 

In mathematics you are seeking an answer. You are looking for the information in the question that will help you find the solution. Mathematics questions contain information – enough information for you to be able to reach the required solution. The information could be in words, numbers, measurement, process etc. Whilst there are often different journeys to the solution, as a general clue you need to be using all the information given to you to find the answer.

 

Do not get flustered

It is very easy to become flustered on difficult math problems, especially word problmes. One reason our normal breathing quickly changes to short, agitated breaths is we start reading and re-reading the same question over again. Hope that by the fourth read we will finally get it. At this point, re-reading is clearly an example of diminishing—and frustrating—returns. What to do?…

 

Let your brain decipher the question

It often may take about 30-seconds—and a couple (and only a couple) of calm rereads of the question—to decipher a complicated math question. After all, it is complicated. Deciphering the question means understanding what the question is asking. Next, find the solution path. To do so, think—or even write down—the necessary steps to get to the solution.

A few pieces of good news: you can take longer on complicated questions. After all, there aren’t too many of them. Just make sure to solve the easy and medium questions quickly and accurately. Secondly, you can always come back to a question. Sometimes, it is easier to decode the second time around.

Read the question carefully

Sometimes a problem seems much more complicated than it actually is. The reason is we are misreading a word, or injecting or own word into the question. We spend several minutes labouring through difficult equations only to realize that none of the answer choices matches up with our answer. To avoid this make you sure you don’t rush through the question. Instead, read carefully, and know what the question is asking before attempting the question.

Know when to back off

The great thing is that you can come back to questions. Sadly, many students do not take advantage of this and are unable to pull themselves from a question once they’ve bitten their teeth into it. But knowing when to unclench that jaw is very important. If a minute has gone by and you are unable to make sense of the question, move on!

 

Return with a fresh mind

The best thing about being able to come back to questions is your brain is able to make sense of the question a lot more easily the second time around. What seemed cryptic and inscrutable now seems much clearer.

"How to Approach Complicated Math Problems - Magoosh GRE Blog."Magoosh GRE Blog. 19 Dec. 2012. Web. 30 Nov. 2015.

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